Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints: Ada Lovelace

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One of the first computer programmers in the world was Ada Lovelace, a woman who lived during the 1800s, yet the number of women in STEM careers today is lower than in any other field.  AAUW did some research to find out why women were under represented in this field in a report called Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.  Here is a synopsis of their findings:


So how can we, as educators, encourage more women to join STEM related fields and debunk the gender bias that exists in STEM? We can start by integrating it into the classroom so that all students gain experience with STEM concepts, and Design Sprints are a great place to start. I recently learned about design sprints from my friend Kristen at  innovationinfirst.wordpress.com while I attended the #InnEdCO18 conference in June. Design sprints ask students to answer a question or solve a problem in a specific amount of time using the design thinking process. The ISTE Standards for Students defines the deliberate design process as: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes, scientific method. 

The last design sprint in this 4 part series focuses on computer programing using Code Club: Scratch as part of a bigger PBL unit. Discover more great picture books to launch a design sprint with a STEAM challenge in your classroom using the 4 picture books highlighted in this series: What If . . . , Abby Invents Unbreakable Crayons, The World is Not A Rectangle, and Ada Lovelace.

Little People, Big Dreams Ada Lovelace by Isabel Sanchez Vegara



This book was first published in the US in March of 2018, and it is one of the best children's books I have read about the life of Ada Lovelace. Born in 1815, Ada Lovelace was the daughter of the famous poet Lord Byron and the logical mathematician Lady Byron. Ada was equally creative and mathematical. Since her father left when Ada was just an infant, however, her creativity and imaginative inventions were not encouraged by her mother. Instead, her mother wanted Ada to focus solely on logic and mathematical thinking. 

When Ada was 17 years old, she was introduced to Charles Babbage, the inventor of a large calculator machine. She was one of the few people who understood how the calculator worked. "Ada thought she could use math . . . to make the calculator do even more amazing things! She wrote a code made up of numbers that would tell the calculator what to do. Ada didn't know it, but she had just invented the language that computers use today." This well written story conveys complex ideas in simple language for children, and the lovely illustrations help capture the life of Ada Lovelace. It also includes more detailed facts about her life in the back of the book. Her story is a powerful one–a woman who invented the language of code in a time when women were not thought to be capable of this type of complex thinking. Even today, the number of women in the fields of math and science are startlingly low, so I love sharing that a woman from the 1800s was the inventor of computer programming. It was her work that led to the invention of the first computer 100 years later. The book ends with this idea, "She showed that when you use science and imagination, your dreams can take flight." 

Science + Technology + Math= Scratch Poetry

This summer I became a Raspberry Pi certified educator. During our training, I learned about code club, which was designed for after school clubs that get kids coding. They have step by step tutorials which kids can walk through independently, and they can even cross off the items on the list as they complete them! It's great for after school programs, but it's also great for teachers who want to implement coding in the classroom but may not know how to start. Code Club has courses for projects done with Scratch, Raspberry Pi, Python, and more! If you haven't tried it, I highly recommend checking out their resources here!

One of the resources created by Code Club is a tutorial using Scratch called Ada's Poetry Generator. Ada Lovelace is generally recognized as the first computer programmer, and there is even an Ada Lovelace Day on the 2nd Tuesday in October, which was founded to celebrate the achievements of women in STEM. This would be a great time of year to launch a PBL unit that includes computer programming as an entry event. As part of the Ada Lovelace Day celebration, read about Ada Lovelace and have students code their own poetry generator! The instructions for this program have students create lists of nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to generate poems (a great way to integrate literacy as well!). 

I coded my own poetry generator, but I tweaked the program to create poems about Mars so that it would fit into a PBL unit on the solar system. I coded the poems to start with "Mars . . . " and ended with the line "Interesting Mars" in the style of a diamante poem. The other words and phrases in poem are random, however, so it does not follow the poem's structure exactly, but you should get a different poem each time.  Click on the picture of Ada Lovelace below to check out the example I created. Be sure to type in your name when she asks you what your name is, and she will tell you to click on the computer to generate your poem.
As an entry event for a PBL unit about the solar system, students studying the solar system (4th and 5th graders at my school) can try using the poem generator above (or one that you create to align specifically with your standards) and write down the words and phrases that are generated. Then, students can follow up with their own research to see how the words and phrases are related to Mars. Next, students split up into groups to do research about planets or other elements of the solar system that they are studying to create their own poem generator using Scratch with the facts that they learned about the solar system. As a learning center, students could explore the other poetry generators created by their classmates in a jigsaw style learning activity to learn about other parts of the solar system researched by other students. These poetry generators could then be used as the PBL entry event for students the following year. 

Tip: Use thinglink to share all the poem generators that students create on different topics.  

There are so many topics that could be used with this poetry generator! How would you use this in your classroom?

Literacy + STEAM = Design Sprints: The World is Not a Rectangle

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Student engagement matters. This infographic based on the Levels of Engagement from the research of Phillip Schlechty define what level of buy-in you really have from your students. Sitting quietly does not necessarily equal learning. When students are authentically engaged, they learn at high and profound levels.


So how do we create high levels of engagement in our classroom? Design sprints are one answer! They fit perfectly into a Project Based Learning unit, which is another way to create high levels of engagement. I recently learned about design sprints from my friend Kristen at  innovationinfirst.wordpress.com while I attended the #InnEdCO18 conference in June. Design sprints ask students to answer a question or solve a problem in a specific amount of time using the design thinking process. The ISTE Standards for Students defines the deliberate design process as: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes, scientific method. 

This design sprint is going to focus on Project Based Learning. This is the third post in this 4 part series: Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints (Check out the first post in this series What If . . . and the second post in this series Abby Invents Unbreakable Crayons). Discover great picture books to launch a design sprint with a STEAM challenge in your classroom. 

The World is not a Rectangle A Portrait of Architect Zaha Hadid by Jeanette Winter



This book, published in 2017, is about the creative designs of architect Zaha Hadid. She was an Arabic, a Muslim, and a woman who designed unusual, flowing buildings without traditional corners, and that made her designs controversial at times. She wanted her designs to reflect nature in the world around her. One of her quotes is the title for this book: "The world is not a rectangle. You don't go out into a park and say, 'My God, we don't have any corners.'" This book does a beautiful job of showing the inspiration for Zaha Hadid's work. It describes, "Her buildings swoosh and zoom and flow and fly." It shows illustrations of the swaying grasses and marshes that inspired the Signature Towers in Dubai, and the wind in the sand dunes that inspired the Bee'ah Headquarters in Sharjah. She holds the shell that inspired her design for the Al Wakrah Stadium in Qatar, and she sees the Guangzhou Opera House in China that looks like pebbles in the water on the outside, and, "Inside the opera house, a singer is the pearl in an oyster shell." This tribute to the career of Zaha Hadid includes facts about the life of this influential architect and over 10 of her designs and the inspiration behind them: galaxies, the flow of the water, the mountains, and jungles. Zaha Hadid passed away in 2016, but she left her mark on the world. A note from the author at the end of the book sums it up perfectly, "When I first saw photos of Zaha Hadid's architectural designs in 2010, the buildings seemed to fly. My spirit took flight–to a place in my imagination that only landscape had taken me before. I had to find out more about her."


Science + Engineering + Art = Minecraft Designs


I took a class this summer from my good friend Brandon Petersen who works for Microsoft, and I learned about how to use Minecraft EDU in the classroom. It is amazing! It is the perfect tool for students to use as an entry event or to create a product during a PBL unit. My district invested in computers from Microsoft, and with it came a free Minecraft EDU account for every student for the next 3 years! Woot! Woot! If you don't have Minecraft EDU accounts for your students, you can purchase school licenses for $5 per student (Click here for more info).  There are some amazing things you can do with Minecraft EDU as a learning tool in the classroom, and there is a whole bank of lesson plans to get you started.

Using the PBL Project Design Overview from BIE, here is a PBL unit that can be done in the architectural style of Zaha Hadid with flowing lines that mimic nature, so students can become architects using Minecraft EDU.

Name of Project: Design a Zoo
Subject: Life Science
Grade Level: 2nd and/or 4th

Key Knowledge and Understanding (CCSS or other standards)
In Colorado, 2nd graders and 4th graders life science standards and essential questions focus on habitat: How do living things depend on their environment? Organisms depend on their habitat’s nonliving parts to satisfy their needs. (2nd grade). How are resources shared among organisms in a specific ecosystem or habitat?  How do nonliving components of an ecosystem influence living components? There is interaction and interdependence between and among living and nonliving components of systems. (4th grade).

Success Skills/21st Century Skills (to be taught and assessed)

Project Summary (include student role, issue, problem or challenge, action taken and purpose)
On the Minecraft Education Edition website, there is a lesson plan called Design a Zoo. Students research 8 ecosystems and 1 animal for each ecosystem. Then they design a zoo in Minecraft that houses 5 different animals in different ecosystems.

Driving Question: Can you design and create a zoo in Minecraft EDU that simulates the habitat of 5 different animals found in 5 different ecosystems?
These Guiding Ideas were on the lesson plan on the  Minecraft Education Edition website:
What is an ecosystem? 
What is the difference between a food chain and a food web? 
What happens to animals or plants that live in an ecosystem that does not meet its needs? 
Give some examples of living things in an ecosystem and some nonliving things. 
What are the basic needs of animals? 
What do herbivores eat? What do omnivores eat? 
What do carnivores eat? 
What does extinction mean? 
What does adaptation mean? 
What are the five groups of vertebrate animals?
Entry Event
Take students on a Virtual Reality field trip to see The Birds of Denver Zoo, or The San Diego Zoo with Google Expeditions. Included in these virtual reality field trips are questions and facts to share with students as you take the tour together. For example, in The Birds of Denver Zoo, it says, "Welcome to the Denver Zoo! You're now in our Rainforest Exhibit in Bird World. In this immersive habitat there are lots of different species, but they can be difficult to spot. As you look around, find features of the exhibit that could help meet the needs of birds. Hint: food, water, shelter, and space to be active!" It also includes information about the waterfall found in the exhibit, "In this exhibit, there is a waterfall as well as a small pond. How might birds use these to meet their needs? Fun fact: Some of the birds perch by this waterfall, using it like a shower to clean their feathers!"

Then read the book, The World is Not A Rectangle by Jeanette Winter. Discuss how architect Zaha Hadid used nature as an inspiration for her architectural designs. Tell students their task: Can you design and create a zoo in Minecraft EDU that simulates the habitat of 5 different animals found in 5 different ecosystems? Then ask them if they can design their zoos with nature as an inspiration for the buildings they must include in the habitat, just like Zaha Hadid. Try to avoid corners and square spaces for their animals and use nature as an inspiration for their space.

Product
Working in groups of 5, students create a scale model of the zoo in Minecraft EDU from their initial design. (I suggest having one Minecraft world for each group of 5 students, and each student in the group can build one of the habitats for the zoo in that world in collaboration with the other members of the group). It will include 5 different habitats with a different animal in each habitat. It must include the important things that those animals depend on in their environment to survive. Students will be able to speak to the following questions as they relate to the animals in their zoo:
(2nd grade)
What are the basic needs of plants and animals?
   How are the basic needs of all living things similar and different?
   How do living things depend on their environment?

   How does an organism respond when basic needs are not met?
(4th grade)
   How are resources shared among organisms in a specific ecosystem or habitat?

   How do nonliving components of an ecosystem influence living components?
  What would happen if the Sun’s energy no longer reached Earth?
  What would happen if water were removed from an ecosystem?

Making Products Public (include how the products will be made public and who students will engage with during/at the end of project)
Because of the similarities in the 2nd and 4th grade life science unit, students in those grade levels can present and/or collaborate on the design of their zoo. They can ask students to take a tour of their zoo.
For a more authentic audience, contact your local zoo to see if someone on the staff would be willing to listen to students present their ideas and give feedback on the virtual zoos they created.

Resources Needed
Minecraft EDU accounts (Click here for more info)

Reflection Methods (how individual, team, and/or whole class will reflect during/at end of project)
Have students use Flip Grid (which is now free for educators!) to reflect on different stages of the process: The research, the design, building in Minecraft, and feedback from students and zoo staff members.

Click here to make a copy of this plan on a google doc to get you started. I know you will need to make changes in order to add details of the research and learning your students will need to do, and to add specific details for your unit, but this should help you get started. There are also more great lesson plans you can find on the  Minecraft Education Edition website that relate to this life science standard:

Students use Minecraft to create a bird-attracting garden.
Lesson Objectives
  • Students understand adaptations for survival of living things.
  • Students understand how the environment can impact a living thing.
Guiding Ideas
Students should be able to include a variety of features in their garden which will allow a bird to survive such as; a bird bath, bird house, plants of varying sizes, a fence to keep out predators etc.
Students should consider the adaptations of the particular birds they are trying to attract and design their garden based on these adaptations. For example, if the students were wanting to attract an eagle, they would need to include other small animals in their garden to ensure the eagles would be attracted to a food source.
Students should include a description of their garden on a sign-post created in their world. They should include their design decisions and the justification for these decisions.
What will be providing the birds with a food source?
What will provide the birds with a water source?
What will provide the birds shelter?
Will there be any protection available in your garden?
What information would be important to include in your signage?
What types of tools will you need to construct your garden?
What resources will you need?
Can you design it to scale?
Would your design be feasible to implement in reality? What about the school setting?



Deforestation is occurring at an alarming rate! Since the 1990’s it has doubled and continues today. Deforestation happens all over the world.



Learning Objectives

  • Students will design and create Minecraft worlds illustrating the before and after effects of deforestation from 1990 or prior and 2016 in an area
  • Students will make predictions for the next 5-10 years in that same area based on the rapid rate of deforestation since 1990.
  • Students will research and present their call to action for slowing the process of deforestation in their community.




Students investigate the relationship between elephant and man. 



Learning Objectives
  • Students develop an understanding of the complex issues surrounding habitat destruction and land-use conflict
  • Students use case studies to identify solutions that have been tried and tested – and use tools to assess their relative success
  • Students use their developing understanding of the needs and preferences of both elephant and human communities to design and trial a range of solutions in Minecraft
  • NGSS - HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.

Have you ever used Minecraft EDU in the classroom? What was your experience? I can't wait to give it a try this year!


Don't forget to check back for more ideas in the series Literacy + STEAM= Design Thinking Sprints! The last post in this series will feature the book:









Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints: Abby Invents Unbreakable Crayons

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience, but at no cost to you. Thank you for your support!

Good teaching is good teaching. Although trends in education ebb and flow, just like in fashion, the good stuff comes back in style! The maker movement may be a new name, but the concept of kids as creators is not a new one. Tinker toys were invented in 1914 and Legos have been around since the 1940s so kids have been creating for a long time. However, this is one of the first times that education has embraced this creativity and harnessed it to pinpoint learning targets. By presenting authentic problems or inquiry questions for students to solve and outlining steps using design thinking to solve them, education has opened a whole new door for a deeper, more comprehensive learning experience for students.

I recently learned about design sprints from my friend Kristen at innovationinfirst.wordpress.com while I attended the #InnEdCO18 conference in June. Design sprints give students an opportunity to use the design thinking process to answer a question or solve a problem in a specific amount of time. The ISTE Standards for Students defines the deliberate design process as: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes, scientific method. 

This is the second post in this 4 part series: Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints (click here to see the first post in the series; Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints: What If . . . ) Discover great picture books to launch a design sprint with a STEAM challenge in your classroom. 

Abby Invents Unbreakable Crayons by Dr. Arlyne Simon



Abby Invents Unbreakable Crayons is another great new book that hit the shelves in May 2018 which encourages kids to be scientific thinkers and inventors. It begins with a visit to Abby's classroom from the inventor of a robot that helps kids with their homework. I love that the inventor is a woman of color and Abby gasps, "She looks like me." While coloring a picture about their visitor, Abby and her friends are frustrated when their crayons keep breaking. That is when Abby decides to invent unbreakable crayons, and her teacher tells her, "You are a problem-solver. You are an inventor. You solve problems big and small because you have great ideas." Then Abby uses design thinking to create unbreakable crayons.

 

Another framework for design thinking created by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani is called the LAUNCH Cycle. It is a student-friendly framework for students to use as they become innovators. You can find more information from A.J. Juliani in his blog post A Beginner's Guide to Design Thinking in the Classroom and a free download of the LAUNCH posters.


You can see Abby follow this framework as she invents her unbreakable crayons.


Abby asks the teacher to get crayons that do not break only to discover, "There isn't one crayon in the whole, wide world that doesn't break?!" 



This leads her to some important questions: "What are crayons made of? How are crayons made? Why do crayons break?" 



She does research at the library to discover the process for how crayons are made, what makes them hard, and what gives them their color. 


Then Abby analyzes her information. You see pictures of her notebook as she outlines what she learned about how crayons are made. She makes notes about her ideas for what will make the perfect unbreakable crayon. 



Then she creates a prototype in the science lab at her school. She tries different variables such as the amount of dye and the baking and cooling time, but all of her crayons still break.


When her prototypes aren't working, her teacher encourages her to look for everyday items that don't break. Abby brings her notebook to the playground to collect data and finds a common trend in things that don't break: hard plastic. She tries making crayons again using hard plastic and comes up with the perfect recipe for unbreakable crayons. She tests them out by jumping on them, trying to bend them, and she even has the teacher run them over with the school bus! 


She shares her invention with her classmates because she has finally made unbreakable crayons. She even receives a patent for her invention!

This is a great book to show K-2 elementary students what it looks like to go through the LAUNCH Design Thinking Process. It fosters a growth mindset because there are a lot of failures before Abby gets it right, which is what our students will experience when inventing too. So have your student's become inventors!

The Global Day of Design


Right now educators across the globe want to harness the power of children's creativity, so there are a lot of resources to help you get your students inventing. The creators of the LAUNCH Cycle have also started the Global Day of Design as an opportunity for teachers to implement design thinking in their classrooms. This year, they posted several different design challenges, or design sprints, leading up to the Global Day of Design.  From designing their own Flappy Bird game to designing a school on Mars, there are some great opportunities for students to be creative.


John Spencer has created a bunch of maker challenge introduction videos which are the perfect tool to help you kick off a design sprint. This Cardboard Arcade Game challenge (above) is an example, and it's also a great connection to the Global Cardboard Challenge.

The Global Cardboard Challenge


Another one of my favorite design challenge events is the Cardboard Challenge. This event all started with Caine's Arcade. The creativeness of one little boy who shared his invention globally helped spark the maker movement. My district has been participating in the Global Cardboard Challenge for years, and thousands of students K - 12 from our district come to showcase their cardboard designs.


Some teachers in my school run an after school club to help students prepare for the cardboard challenge every year. My son was in kindergarten this year, and he participated for the first time. There were literally thousands of projects, and the problem solving, creativity, collaboration, communication and critical thinking was just amazing.



As you are creating a long-range plan for this coming school year, get these events on your calendar! The Cardboard Challenge comes at the beginning of the school year in early October and the Global Day of Design takes place in May. These are great opportunities to start and end your year harnessing the power of student creativity through design challenges!

Don't forget to check back for more ideas in the series Literacy + STEAM= Design Thinking Sprints!
The next featured book will be:





Literacy + STEAM= Design Sprints: What If . . .

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience, but at no cost to you. Thank you for your support!

When you combine literacy, STEAM, and the opportunity to apply design thinking, you have the perfect recipe for creating your own design sprint! A design sprint is a question or problem to solve in a specific amount of time. I recently learned about design sprints from my friend Kristen at innovationinfirst.wordpress.com during the #InnEdCO18 conference. You've probably heard the term design thinking–it is the all the rage right now. Design thinking is a process for creative problem solving. The ISTE Standards for Students defines the deliberate design process as: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes, scientific method. According to Jonathan Courtney, "Design Sprints use the philosophy of Design Thinking as a foundation, a philosophy, a toolkit for innovation . . . But the Design Sprint is one great way of systematically executing all of it."  

This 4 part Design Sprint series will focus on a book, a design thinking strategy, and a STEAM challenge, so check back to read all 4 posts. Bonus: Many of the featured books in this series star women, people of color, and people from different countries as the main characters!

What If . . . by Samantha Berger



This beautiful new book (published in April 2018) inspires kids to create! It begins, "With a pencil and paper, I write and draw art to create many stories that come from my heart." And if she didn't have a pencil or paper she'd use the table, the wall paper, and the floorboards to create. She would sculpt with leaves and snow, or use her voice and her body to sing and dance out her stories. At the end there is a note from the author and artist about the inspiration for this book. A flood forced the author, Samantha Berger, to evacuate her apartment and she lost everything. She writes, "After the flood hit, I had nothing to work with at all: no paints, no brushes, no markers, no nothing. It was then that I started to realize anything could be used as an art supply–the pinecones on the trees, the paper in the recycling bin, the kibble in my dog's dish–and I used them all! When I understood that everything could be used to express myself, it made me see the world in a whole new way." 

This book is geared toward primary classrooms, and it's a great beginning-of-year read aloud to introduce the concept of a maker space and STEAM challenges. 

       


Science + Art + Literacy= Maker Space Stories

The last line of the book What if . . .  says, "As long as I live, I will always create." What a perfect introduction to begin your own maker space in your classroom! If you emphasize that this story is about creating stories, you can begin writer's workshop by getting your students passionate about creating stories of their own using the materials in your maker space. They can use many different mediums to create illustrations and inspiration for their stories, which is what a maker space is all about. The book Rain Fish by Lois Ehlert is a great example of using maker space materials to create illustrations in a story. In this book, the narrator sees debris in the shape of fish float by after it rains. Connect this idea to the science concept of reduce, reuse, and recycle, and students can create art with trash and reuse items that they collect out on the playground. In the style of Rain Fish, students can find pictures in the debris and turn it into a story. Even better, they can embed important science concepts in their story to show their learning like the book Sea Bones by Bob Barner. Use a tool like book creatorshadow puppet edu, or pic collage to publish a story with their recycled pictures as the illustrations for their book. You could even use the app Faces iMake to create the illustrations if you didn't have the materials you needed to create pictures with the real items. Lois Ehlert and Bob Barber have other books that would be great introductions to the concept of maker space illustrations in stories:

      



Leo Lionni is another author that can inspire stories with maker space art. I used this idea when I was a classroom teacher and wrote about it in this blog post (Fairytales and Fables) many years ago. I still love the idea of students writing and illustrating stories in the style of Leo Lionni, but I would update this idea by adding stop motion animation.  
HUE Animation Studio (Green)
During the #InnEdCO18 conference, I won an animation studio from Hue! I was excited to give it a try, so my son and I created a short video to retell part of the story Alexander and the Wind-up Mouse by Leo Lionni. We created the characters using the directions in the video above. Then we used the background from the animation studio to record.


The animation studio had some handy features such as a shadow that showed the last spot you placed objects to make it easier to create your motion. It also had a camera with a stand and bendable neck that positioned the camera (although I think the pictures came out a little distorted). To be honest, I don't think I would buy more of the animation studios. I had trouble setting things up in the beginning, and although I got it to work and my son was SO excited about creating movies, we have made stop motion videos that were just as good with the free iPad app stop motion.  Especially if you want to have access to more than one camera at a time in a classroom, I would definitely stick with iPads. However, I will continue to use the camera with their software since I have it. 

There are a lot of creative opportunities when you let students' imaginations soar. Just give them a few materials and a platform to publish and you will be amazed at what they can write!

CCSS: W.K.2, W.K.3, W.K.6, W.K.8, W.1.2, W.1.3, W.1.6, W.1.8, W.2.2, W.2.3, W.2.6, W.2.8, W.3.2, W.3.3, W.3.6, W.3.8

    

Math + Art = Origami Frogs 

The girl in this story folds paper into origami characters, which is a great opportunity to do some art and math. One of my favorite origami activities to do in the classroom is a frog jumping contest! Students make origami frogs and measure how far their frogs can jump. It's a great opportunity to have students measure with different tools (rulers, yard sticks, and non-standard measuring tools like cubes and string). I originally got this idea from the resource book Origami Math (above) many years ago. It includes written instructions for folding origami shapes, including the origami frog. I would update this lesson by creating a design sprint for students.

The Engineering Design Process is the methodology I would use to help students create their origami frogs.

How do I create an origami frog? The video above is a great resource. As students iterate this process, they may ask: How can I make my frog jump farther? Higher?


How big/small should I make my frog? What kind of paper should I use? 


Have different materials available for students such as card stock, construction paper, tissue paper, and paper that has been laminated so students can create a plan with the materials that you have available. 


Collect data: Create a graph to keep track of how far/high different types of frogs jump. 
Experiment: How does the size of the frog effect how far it jumps? How does the type of paper effect how far the frog can jump? 


My students decided to improve the design of the back legs, the aerodynamics of the head, as well as the size and type of paper they used. You'll be amazed at their creativity and thinking!

CCSS: 1.MD.A.2, 1.MD.C.4, 2.MD.A.1, 2.MD.A.4, 2.MD.D.9, 2.MD.D.10, 3.MD.B.3, 3.MD.B.4

Don't forget to check back for more ideas in the series Literacy + STEAM= Design Thinking Sprints!
The next featured book will be: